Dmitri shostakovich - concertgebouworkest royal concertgebouw orchestra the jazz-album


A half century after it was written, Death of a Salesman remains a powerful drama. Its indictment of fundamental American values and the American Dream of material success may seem somewhat tame in today’s age of constant national and individual self-analysis and criticism, but its challenge was quite radical for its time. After World War II, the United States faced profound and irreconcilable domestic tensions and contradictions. Although the war had ostensibly engendered an unprecedented sense of American confidence, prosperity, and security, the United States became increasingly embroiled in a tense cold war with the Soviet Union. The propagation of myths of a peaceful, homogenous, and nauseatingly gleeful American golden age was tempered by constant anxiety about Communism, bitter racial conflict, and largely ignored economic and social stratification. Many Americans could not subscribe to the degree of social conformity and the ideological and cultural orthodoxy that a prosperous, booming, conservative suburban middle-class championed.

Operas:
- The Nose
- The Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk
Ballets:
- The Age of Gold
- The Bolt
- The Limpid Stream
Orchestral
- 15 Symphonies
- 2 Piano Concertos
- 2 Violin Concertos
- 2 Cello Concertos
- various theatre and film scores
Chamber Music
- 15 String Quartets
- various sonatas
Vocal Music
- many songs
- arrangements of folksongs
- various choral works
Piano
- many pieces for solo piano

Russia's new Leninist government recognized Shostakovich as a valuable political tool. During the 1920s, the Soviet cultural bureau was eager to set new trends and provided him with commissions for the concert hall and stage. By the early 1930s, however, Shostakovich's avant-grade forms, brash harmonies, and sarcastic idioms brought him into disfavor with the regime then headed by Stalin. Although popular amongst Russian audiences, he was forced to suppress new works and remove others from the active repertoire. For the remainder of his life, Shostakovich bore the weight of a hypocritical order that threatened to destroy his life while at the same time decorating him with awards and promoting him abroad as the Revolution's musical prodigy. As he grew increasingly famous worldwide, the physical and mental strains he suffered were great. Shostakovich's support for Leninism, if leading biographies are accurate, had already dwindled while in childhood. He witnessed the bloodshed of the 1917 Revolution first-hand, was malnourished in its succeeding years, and worked exhausting hours as a silent movie pianist after school to help family ends meet in the post-Revolutionary economy. His father had died in 1922 and the once comfortable Shostakovich family thereafter struggled in Russia's new social order.


Dmitri Shostakovich - Concertgebouworkest Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra The Jazz-AlbumDmitri Shostakovich - Concertgebouworkest Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra The Jazz-AlbumDmitri Shostakovich - Concertgebouworkest Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra The Jazz-AlbumDmitri Shostakovich - Concertgebouworkest Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra The Jazz-Album

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